Where to buy
Siding

Siding Resources

Introduction
Siding Home
Siding Gallery
Why Use Western Red Cedar?
Characteristics & Properties of Western Red Cedar
Benefits of Real Cedar
Real Cedar History
Real Cedar Certification
Sustainability and the Environment
Design & Spec
Siding Grades
Siding Profiles
Bevel
Board & Batten
Tongue & Groove
Lap or Channel
Western Red Cedar Trim Boards
Western Red Cedar Shingle Panels
Siding Calculator
Build & Install
Preparation
Pre-Building
DuPont Tyvek DrainWrap
Installation
General Installation
Installing Profiles
Bevel
Board & Batten
Tongue & Groove
Lap or Channel
Trim Boards
Shingle Panels
Finish & Maintain
Choosing a Finish
How to Finish
Care & Maintenance
Restoration
Decking

Decking Resources

Introduction
Decking Home
Decking Gallery
Why Use Western Red Cedar?
Characteristics & Properties of Western Red Cedar
Benefits of Real Cedar
Real Cedar History
Real Cedar Certification
Sustainability and the Environment
Planning
Decking Grades
Span Tables
Decking Calculator
Deck Projects
Roof Deck
Raised Deck
Ground Level Deck
Uphill Sloping Lot Deck
Build & Install
Fasteners
Stairs & Railings
Finish & Maintain
Choosing a Finish
How to Finish
Care & Maintenance
Restoration
Outdoor

Outdoor Resources

Introduction
Outdoor Home
Outdoor Gallery
Why Use Western Red Cedar?
Characteristics & Properties of Western Red Cedar
Benefits of Real Cedar
Real Cedar History
Real Cedar Certification
Sustainability and the Environment
Design & Spec
Real Cedar Free DIY Project Plans
Pre-Built Kits
Design Tips
Build & Install
Project Preparation
Fasteners
Fence Construction
Western Red Cedar Fence Specifications
Pre-Built Fence Panels
Finish & Maintain
Choosing a Finish
How to Finish
Care & Maintenance
Restoration
Indoor

Indoor Resources

Introduction
Indoor Home
Indoor Gallery
Why Use Western Red Cedar?
Characteristics & Properties of Western Red Cedar
Benefits of Real Cedar
Real Cedar History
Real Cedar Certification
Sustainability and the Environment
Design & Spec
Cedar Saunas
Traditional Saunas
Infrared Cedar Saunas
Design Tips
Build & Install
Tongue & Groove Paneling
Doors & Windows
Blinds & Shutters
Preparation
Finish & Maintain
How to Finish
Care & Maintenance
About Us

About Real Cedar

The WRCLA
About Us
Our Mission
WRCLA Events
Contact Us
Our Members
Executive Members
Affiliate Retailers
Affiliate Manufacturers
Affiliate Partners
Certified Cedar Distributors
Certified Cedar Distributors USA
Certified Cedar Distributors Canada
International Associates
Asia
Europe
Oceania
Gallery
Videos
Blog
Resources
For Architects
Member Login

Project of the Week – Brother & Sister

Architect: Simon Storey, Anonymous Architects
Location: Los Angeles, California
Photography: Steve King, LA

Crane _ Anonymous - re-work FINAL (1)

“I’ve always loved the keeping it real aesthetics of cedar & in addition to that, it is termite resistant.” – SIMON STOREY, AIA

Speculative design has its challenges. An architect has to imagine what a future client would want simply based on the vibe of the location. In Simon Storey’s case, the spec project was for the hip, yet somewhat bucolic, Mt. Washington area of LA. Which means new residential structures should be modern and efficient in form, but also environmentally and aesthetically respectful of the surrounding rugged beauty. The award-winning architect also had to contend with building two houses on a limited lot size.

CLEAR CHOICE : The natural finish of the exterior WRC complements the rugged beauty of the Mt. Washington area.

CLEAR CHOICE : The natural finish of the exterior WRC complements the rugged beauty of the Mt. Washington area.

But Storey managed to factor in all those design considerations… and then some. The result is Brother & Sister, a matching pair of beautiful cedar-clad cubes with large bay windows that provide expansive views of the San Gabriel mountain range. The homes are warm, contemporary and, true to form, energy efficient.

“I’m always interested in producing a house as efficiently as possible and also making that house efficient to live in for the future,” explains Storey, principal at Anonymous Architects.“The selection of materials and the compact form all help achieve this. I also built the homes into the hillside, which will have a regulating effect on the interior air temperature and humidity.”

small brother 5

For the V-joint siding, he opted for a knotty grade of Western Red Cedar, as opposed to a pristine clear grade.

“I specified knotty wood because part of the reason we used wood in the first place was to integrate the houses into a natural and wild environment,” he says. “The extra character that the knots provide helps to achieve this design goal. It looks exactly how I envisioned.”

And if the exterior’s not exactly how the future occupants envisioned, Storey’s not worried. After all, nothing is set in stone with nature’s most versatile building material.

small brother3

“Western Red Cedar has a maintenance schedule that the owner can choose,” explains Storey. “For example, the owner could maintain the finished facade, or just leave it to weather naturally to a beautiful silver patina. I like that there are options here — for both the future of how the buildings will age and also staining and aesthetic options when the wood is first installed.”

small brother1

WRC Specs
Grade: KD Select Knotty
Size: 1×4 V-joint
Fastening: Blind nailed
Applied finish: Clear water based/hybrid oil